projectors

ViewSonic PRO8200 1080p Projector Review

The ViewSonic Pro8200 could make for an affordable home theater experience.

January 24, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Motion Smoothness

The ViewSonic Pro8200 offers no motion processing features meant to smooth out moving objects, and as a result we saw the usual level of detail loss. When we moved some photographs back and forth across the screen, faces would blur into a mash of features, like a cubist portrait, and detailed lines would band together, losing their intricacy. We also noticed that blocks of colors left trails as they glided across the screen, another smoothness issue.

Motion Artifacting

Artifacting was not as much of a problem as the smoothness. Hard edges in motion were reproduced jaggedly, and there was some minor shape distortion to rectangles, a result of a slow processor. The ViewSonic Pro8200 could redraw a couple rows of pixels rather than rerender the entire picture at once. On the other hand, we saw no false colors in any of our tests, even high contrast, high density patterns, a mark of quality for video devices.

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3:2 Pulldown & 24fps

The ViewSonic Pro8200 had no problems producing 24fps pictures, with very litter flicker. There was some noticeable judder, especially on slow panning shots, but this is a problem endemic to most projectors.

Resolution Scaling

The ViewSonic Pro8200 has a native resolution of 1080p, making it a good fit for home theater use. We tested a few other NTSC standard formats in case you happen to want to see standard definition or have HD content in 720p. 480p produced the least amount of moiré and high frequency interference, with 720p not far behind. At the higher resolution, small text was harder to read in 720p than in 480p.

Unfortunately, we saw the most moiré interference in this projector's native 1080p. Delicately defined patterns banded together like the lines on a bent lenticular print. Much of this has to do with the keystoning. As you change the trapezoidal shape of the picture to fit your screen, something you generally must do because you will be projecting the picture on an angle, these intricate patterns will not be reproduced very accurately. Text and high resolution patterns were mostly very correct at this resolution.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Remote Control
  9. Connectivity & Media
  10. Power, Noise & Heat
  11. Optoma HD20 Comparison
  12. Epson PowerLite 1775W Comparison
  13. ViewSonic PJD5123 Comparison
  14. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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