projectors

ViewSonic PJD6531w

The ViewSonic PJD6531w produced a lot of light and had good color performance—after it was calibrated.

July 09, 2010
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Motion Smoothness

The PJD6531w can display images at up to 120Hz (that is, 120 times a second), but we saw no evidence that it uses this speed to smooth the motion of video in the same way that many HDTVs do. Instead, the projector simply shows the images as they are received, without any of the motion processing or motion compensation that standard HDTVs use. That's not to say that the motion on this projector was bad: we saw cleanly reproduced motion that looked smooth and attractive.

Motion Artifacting

One thing that we did see was the DLP rainbow effect, where some color fringing can be seen on fast moving objects. This is caused by the way that DLP projectors like this create colors by showing images in different colors (usually red, green, blue and then white) faster than the eye can distinguish them. You eye them combines these images to create the full color experience, except sometimes the images change between the different color images, causing a color fringe. With fast moving objects, this can give a rainbow effect as the color fringe will change, depending on which color was being shown at the time it changed. The amount of the rainbow effect you see depends on both the speed of movement and how sensitive you are to it, but we found this to be less prominent on this than on some projectors.

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3:2 Pulldown & 24fps

The PJD6531w does not support 3:2 pulldown processing, but it can display 24fps (frames per second) signals.

Resolution Scaling

The PJD6531w can deal with any image from a standard definition right up to a 1080p high definition signal, but all images are scaled to fit the WXGA (1200 by 800 pixel) native resolution of the projector. To test how well it handled these, we looked at a number of test screens at several different video resolutions.

480p

These relatively low resolution images are upscaled by the projector to fit most of the screen. As a consequence, they do look rather blocky, but the details of the image are still well reproduced.

720p

Like most WXGA projectors, the PJD6531w letterboxes 720p signals, adding a black strip at the top and bottom that effectively turns the 16:10 aspect ratio into a 16:9 one. However, this also means that it can reproduce every pixel of a 720p signal, and these images looked clean and sharp. If you are connecting this projector to a device such as a Blu-ray player or cable box, this would be the best option to run it at.

1080i & 1080p

Because the PJD6531w doesn't have the resolution to show every pixel of a 1080 video signal (which as 1920 by 1080 pixels), it downscales the image to the same size as a 720p image, showing 1200 by 760 pixels. This downscaling gives images a somewhat soft appearance and looses some details. We also did not see any difference between feeding the projector a 1080i (with 30 interlaced frames a second) image or a 1080p one, which contains 60 full frames a second.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Remote Control
  10. Connectivity & Media
  11. Power, Noise & Heat
  12. Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD Comparison
  13. Optoma HD66 Comparison
  14. Canon LV-8310 Comparison
  15. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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