projectors

Viewsonic PJD5123 DLP Projector Review

The Viewsonic PJD5123 is an entry-level DLP projector that's bright enough to satisfy most demands.

June 01, 2011
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Front

Front Callout

Back

Back Callout
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Sides

Side Callout

Top/Bottom

Top Callout
Bottom Callout

Stand/Mount

A small, rubber foot at the front of the projector can be screwed up and down. There are also three screw holes for mounting it to the ceiling.

Lamp

Replacing the RLC-072 lamp on the PJD5123 will run you, at most, $230. Accessing the lamp is easy, provided you have a small screwdriver. A tiny screw holds the plate covering it in place. Once unscrewed, the plate slides off and offers complete access to the lamp. Like a novelty jewelry box, the plate is well hidden.

Lamp Photo 1
The RLC-072 lamp, available from Viewsonic for $230.

Remote Control Tour

The PJD5123's remote is very small and lightweight, as with many projector remotes. Its underside is slightly curved, so it's not too uncomfortable, overall. It looks a bit counter-intuitive at first, but the problem is largely the readability of the labels. Once you make out the tiny letters, just about everything makes sense. The mysterious, yet charmingly-labeled "My Button" can be programmed to activate a commonly-used function.

Remote Control Image
It's a tiny remote, but it grew on us.

In the Box

The PJD5123 is packed with a quick-start guide, a CD guide, AC cable, remote, batteries, and VGA cable. There is no lens cover or carrying case.

In The Box

Portability

At 5.7 pounds, this projector could easily be tossed in a bag. Of course, if you want one, it'll cost you another $20. And really, if you're planning to carry around a few hundred dollars worth of equipment, you'd at least want a lens cap. Unfortunately, Viewsonic doesn't offer one, even as an accessory. So while it could easily be a portable projector, the PJD5123 is marketed as bare-bones as possible.

Setup Assistance

Setup for this projector is the same as most: attach the power cord, turn it on, and then spend 20 minutes lining up the projection angle and keystone perfectly. There are no automated setup features to help you in this quest.

Aesthetics

The projector is a black box made of cheap plastic. It's covered in slits to vent hot air, of which it produces a lot. It's not bad looking for a projector, but neither is it something we would want displayed in a prominent location. Since it's a projector, though, that's where it's likely to end up. Oh well.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Connectivity & Media
  10. Power, Noise & Heat
  11. Optoma HD20 Comparison
  12. Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD Comparison
  13. ViewSonic PJD6531w Comparison
  14. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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