projectors

Viewsonic PJD5123 DLP Projector Review

The Viewsonic PJD5123 is an entry-level DLP projector that's bright enough to satisfy most demands.

June 01, 2011
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Motion Smoothness

There was basically no motion processing on the Viewsonic PJD5123. Objects juddered blockily across the screen as though they were pages of a flipbook, if flipbooks also showed objects turning green on one side and purple on the other. Flipbooks don't cause rectangles to shear into parallelograms as they move, either, as this projector did. In conclusion, if motion is your concern, flipbooks might be a budget alternative.

Motion Artifacting

When scaled from a 1080p signal instead of the PJD5123's native 800 by 600, the pixels smeared in a way that improved smoothness, but caused problems with artifacts. False coloration still lined the borders of moving objects in purple and green. This stems from the DLP technology and its color wheel, like the "rainbow effect." This projector did not seem to elicit as much rainbow as other DLPs, but if might still cause problems if you're sensitive.

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3:2 Pulldown & 24fps

Sources encoded at 24 frames per second looked awful on this projector. Apart from an initial strobe, there were no serious processing errors. Moving high-frequency patterns still looked atrocious, though, with crawl and horizontal static. Moving stadium seats, which are usually more forgiving, exhibited crazy, rainbow waves. This is likely due to keystone, resolution, and motion problems, but there is unfortunately no way to say how 3:2 pulldown would look without these issues.

Resolution Scaling

Resolution scaling on the PJD5123 was quite bad, due largely to the keystone. Wavy lines of distortion blossomed out from the bottom of the screen and wreaked havoc on high-frequency patterns. Resolution processing was bad to begin with, with some Moiré patterns reduced to a series of vertical lines in 1080p. Sharp lines were blurry in 720p, but 1080p was worse, rife with horizontal, staticky lines. For a budget projector, this one can get the point across, but it can't do much beyond that.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Connectivity & Media
  10. Power, Noise & Heat
  11. Optoma HD20 Comparison
  12. Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD Comparison
  13. ViewSonic PJD6531w Comparison
  14. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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