projectors

Optoma PT100 Video Projector Review

Don’t expect much from a $180 projector.

December 10, 2010
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Throw

The Optoma PT100 has a long throw and no zoom lens. This means you should make sure the room is big enough before you buy this product. making it a not-terribly-flexible projector. You need to position it just so in order to fit it correctly to your screen. An 80-inch screen requires a distance of 13 feet, 3 inches.

Ignore the second row of values in the chart below. Because there’s no zoom lens, the wide angle and telephoto are the same.

Screen Brightness

The screen brightness produced by the Optoma PT100 falls off rather quickly as you move the projector further back from the screen. It’s the same for any projector, but the PT100 is super dim as it is. The chart below should give you some idea of whether the Optoma GT720 is right for your particular room layout.

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Screen Materials

You won’t always have a dedicated projector screen or perfectly white wall to project onto. For just such a reason, we check projectors’ images against a grey painted wall, a beige painted wall, wood paneling, and a dry-erase board. We saw the expected color shifts, and unfortunately there’s no easy way to correct the colors. The menu offers an option for correcting colors to a black board surface, but no other type of surface.

Optical Issues

There were virtually no optical issues with the Optoma PT100. In this test, we look for ghosting, color aberrations, or barrel distortion from the lens. We saw none of these problems.

Video Processing

The projector doesn't have any video processing features.

Formats

The Optoma PT100 is a native WVGA projector (854 x 480), and has some severe difficulties displaying non-native content. We could get it to display 480p, 720p, and occasionally 1080p content, but there were significant issues the latter two.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. Canon LV-8310 Comparison
  11. Optoma HD66 Comparison
  12. Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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