projectors

Optoma PK320 Pico Projector Review

Great peak brightness is offset by an inaccurate color gamut.

March 20, 2012
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Throw

None of these pico projectors have a zoom lens, which means they will receive a throw score of zero.

Screen Brightness

Though the Optoma Pico PK320 was the brightest pico we tested, we cannot really suggest that it will be useful for displaying a 140-inch screen. The front page of the marketing specs state that you can fit a 150-inch presentation in your pocket, but we will have to disagree. Yes, it is possible to project a screen that large, but with less than 11 lux, even slight ambient light should overcome such a weak projection. Our screen is 80 inches, and with the lights turned off, 35 lux was great. With the lights on, we could still make out what was on the screen, but you wouldn't want to rely on it for a presentation. Increasing the size of the screen by almost double, having to move the projector back about 8.5 feet, thereby dimming the picture by 60%, we cannot imagine that the Optoma Pico PK320 will satisfy most, if any, 150-inch screen situations.

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Optical Issues

We saw some definite bowing of the picture along the topmost edge, though the other three edges were straight. With three straight edges, there is nothing to do, no angle to adjust, to correct the fourth. Other than that, the pixels were very sharp, and there was little pixel bleed, relatively of course. Pico projectors currently do not have the definition and focus of which home theater projectors are capable. This is one of the many reasons we do not recommend pico projectors as a replacement for a home theater setup, but we find them useful for any number of niche situations, and we are sure consumers can find all sorts of utility for a pico.

Formats

The best we could do was output a 720p picture from the VGA cable. If you have the optional HDMI cable, you can project 720p and 1080i pictures handily.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. AAXA Technologies P4 Comparison
  11. Aiptek PocketCinema V50 Comparison
  12. 3M MP225A Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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