projectors

Optoma PK320 Pico Projector Review

Great peak brightness is offset by an inaccurate color gamut.

March 20, 2012
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Front

Front Callout

Back

Back Callout
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Sides

Side Callout

Top/Bottom

Top Callout
Bottom Callout

Remote Control Tour

At first glance, the remote control looks normal with up, down, left, right arrows, an x and an o button for cancel and accept respectively. Nope, not at all. Each of these buttons corresponds to an option in a three by two table, very rarely having anything to do with directional buttons. The square button below this misleading array is most commonly used for the cancel button, but this changes depending on the menu screen you are using.

On the bright side, there are not that many options so the buttons cannot be that confusing, and the remote is light and easy to handle.

Remote Control Image

In the Box

This pico comes with quite a bit of extra connectivity right in the box. There are included VGA, USB, and AV cords as well as a power wall adapter, a rechargeable battery, and a padded carrying case.

In The Box

Portability

The Optoma Pico PK320 is the smallest and brightest pico in our series of four we just tested. Measuring 4.72 inches long, 2.76 in width, and 1.18 in height, this projector can fit in a jacket pocket for super-spy-like quick presentation of confidential documents (this is how we picture our work here at Reviewed.com).

Setup Assistance

Setup was fairly easy, although it came with no auto setup functions which is how we add points to this score, but it required minimal amounts of angle adjustments for that almost perfectly squared-off picture. There is some measure of upward projection to the picture. Some of these picos need to be projected directly at the center of the screen or section of wall to show an unwarped picture, which does not make sense to us. There are very few occasions where projecting from the middle height of the screen is possible. Generally, you will have your device set up beneath the projector looking up. We appreciate the built-in adjustments on this Optoma model.

Aesthetics

Optoma designed this projector with a gray rounded casing, lending it a very crafted feel. Other picos feel like all the features were slapped on to a rectangular object and as soon as they all fit, the design was done. The Pico PK320 is a tight little package with some good looks to boot.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. AAXA Technologies P4 Comparison
  11. Aiptek PocketCinema V50 Comparison
  12. 3M MP225A Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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