projectors

Optoma PK320 Pico Projector Review

Great peak brightness is offset by an inaccurate color gamut.

March 20, 2012
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Peak Brightness

You can see in the comparison chart that the Optoma Pico PK320 is the brightest pico of the four we tested together. This luminance, though still quite dim by home theater projector and television standards, is getting to be bright enough to be seen clearly with moderate amounts of ambient light. For smaller projections, the Pico PK320 can be used in most lighting settings. We tried it out on the cubicle wall - er, corner office wall - and it was not washed out by the overhead lights or the bright daylight.

Peak Brightness
Peak Brightness Comparison Graph

Tunnel Contrast

This graph looks crazier than it really is. We measure to see if the black level gets brighter as we decrease the area of black on the screen. Ideally, the black level should stay consistently dark, rather than increasing in luminance. Usually, projectors have a hard time with this test, the black level getting significantly brighter as the area decreases. What we see in the chart below is an increase in luminance, but nothing so significant.

Tunnel Contrast
Tunnel Contrast Graph
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Uniformity

We test the luminance at nine different spots on the screen to see how well a projector displays a consistent picture. You can see in our chart here that the Pico PK320 had trouble with the left side of the screen, showing a little more than a 40% decrease in luminance on that whole side. The right side fared better however. Subjectively, we could see that the left side was definitely dimmer than the right, but we did not notice this until we took our readings and made a point of looking for it.

Uniformity
Uniformity Graph

Greyscale Gamma

This gamma graph has a rocky start to be sure, but then it evens out to show almost perfect detail along the grayscale. The graph in the chart below represents the exact gray value displayed for a given gray value input. Ideally, the line should be straight, with a slope of 2.1, which would indicate perfect reproduction of an input signal.

The up and down nature of the graph at the left side shows an inability to reproduce the input signal. Each peak tells us that the gray value displayed was too bright for the given input, and each valley means that the displayed value was too dim. From this data, we see that the Optoma Pico PK320 cannot show certain gray values at the dark end of the spectrum. The straight and smooth line thereafter shows that the middle gray and bright white values have excellent distinction and detail.

Greyscale Gamma
Greyscale Gamma Graph
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. AAXA Technologies P4 Comparison
  11. Aiptek PocketCinema V50 Comparison
  12. 3M MP225A Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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