projectors

Optoma PK320 Pico Projector Review

Great peak brightness is offset by an inaccurate color gamut.

March 20, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Value

We like this comparison because it shows two different types of pico projectors. On one side we have the 3M MP225A, a relatively inexpensive, one-plug setup intended mainly for Apple devices, with no menu system or settings to control whatsoever. It shoots out some great colors but it does not get that bright. On the other side, there is the Optoma Pico PK320, a tiny pico with great connectivity, shining brighter than any of the picos we tested, showing some great shadow detail, with reasonable colors, but costing a pretty penny (actually thousands of pretty pennies).

We see the 3M MP225A being used casually, for people who want to buy into the pico generation of projectors without too much of an investment. You could use it professionally, but if you are serious about having a pico for regular professional use, the Optoma Pico PK320 costs a little more, but has the breadth of port connections, internal memory, and brightness you need for use in any situation.

Blacks & Whites

The Optoma Pico PK320 is almost twice as bright as the 3M MP225A. We'll take it.

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Color

The Optoma Pico PK320 had better color curves, showing smoother transition along the brightness spectrum, but the 3M MP225A had a better color gamut.

Motion

The 3M MP225A had some really bad artifacting problems, showing images wobble in sections across the screen instead of moving as one piece. The Optoma Pico PK320 did not wow us with its motion processing, but it did not pain our eyes either. We like the Optoma Pico PK320 in this contest.

Viewing Effects

The 3M MP225A showed a little more bowing of straight lines and some blurring of pixels than did the Optoma Pico PK320.

Connectivity

This is an outrageous comparison. The 3M MP225A only comes with one proprietary Apple connection, with the option for VGA, and the Optoma Pico PK320 had the largest breadth of ports we saw on a pico so far. If you need to connect to a bunch of devices, the Optoma Pico PK320 is the way to go. If you have an iPhone, iPad, and an iPod, you may very well want to consider the 3M MP225A, but know that only certain apps can project a picture.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. AAXA Technologies P4 Comparison
  11. Aiptek PocketCinema V50 Comparison
  12. 3M MP225A Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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