projectors

Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD

Compact & bright projector that produces a lot of light, but lackluster color performance.

July 04, 2010
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Motion Smoothness

The Epson 705HD does not seem to do any motion processing: it simply displays whatever video frames the device sends it without processing. That is evident on our test image below: shot at 1/60th of a second, you can see just a single frame of the video, indicating that the projector is not inserting other processed frames or doing other tricks to smooth the motion on the screen.

Motion Artifacting

Because the 705HD does not do any video processing, we saw little evidence of any major artifacts in the video, with motion looking smooth and natural. And because this projector uses 3 separate LCDs to create the image, we also saw none of the rainbow effect that often bedevils DLP projectors.

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3:2 Pulldown & 24fps

This projector does not support 3:2 pulldown processing, (often called inverse telecine), which is used by some broadcasters to give their TV shows a more film-like look. Neither does it support a 24 frames a second signal: if you feed it a 24fps signal from a device such as a Blu-ray player, it will not display it.

Resolution Scaling

The 705HD is a WXGA projector, which means it has a resolution of 1280 by 800 pixels. The closest video resolution to this is 720p, but it can also cope with video signals at other resolutions. To test this, we look at a series of test screens at different resolutions. We found that the best results were obtained by providing the projector with a 720p signal, which is closest to the native resolution of the projector.

480p

The Projector scales 480p video to fit into the entire height of the screen. It does a clean job of this, but the image does look somewhat soft. This is not unexpected, though; the projector is stretching a 480 pixel high image to fit.

720p

720p video is the closest to the native resolution of the projector, and it does a very effective job of displaying this, letterboxing the top and bottom of the screen so every pixel of the image is displayed.

1080i & 1080p

Although it is only a 720p projector, the 720p can cope with a higher resolution signal. However, 1080i or 1080p images are down-scaled to fit the same letterboxed size as the 720p images, so the images on screen look somewhat fuzzy and fine details are lost.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Remote Control
  10. Connectivity & Media
  11. Power, Noise & Heat
  12. ViewSonic PJD6531w Comparison
  13. Optoma HD66 Comparison
  14. Canon LV-8310 Comparison
  15. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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