projectors

Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD

Compact & bright projector that produces a lot of light, but lackluster color performance.

July 04, 2010
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Color Temperature

Our first color test looks at the consistency of the color temperature of whites as their intensity decreases. A perfect projector would keep the same color temperature as the intensity increased, but the 705HD was not perfect: we saw a number of distinct shifts in the color temperature, especially at the lower intensities. What this means is that some greys on the screen may have a slight orange look to them.

Color Temperature
Color Temperature Graph

RGB Curves

In this test, we analyze the color response curve for the red, green and blue primary colors. On a perfect display, this curve would be completely smooth, meaning that the projector can accurately reproduce subtle color changes that are in the original image. The 705HD didn't have a very smooth response: all of the curves have lots of stair-steps, which are where the projector didn't accurately reproduce a subtle change in the color on the screen. Below the graph, you can see color gradients, with the top one being the ideal gradient, and the bottom being what the 705HD produced. Here, you can see what the sudden jumps on the graph mean: bands in the gradient that are not present in the original.

RGB Curves Graph
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Color Gamut

We found that the 705HD didn't quite stick to the color limits for HD broadcast colors. These limits (called the color gamut) are set in a standard called Rec.709, which defines what colors are present in an HD signal, so a perfect display would exactly match these. The 705HD did a rather lackluster job here: the red corner of the gamut is significantly off, and the other corners are somewhat shifted. What this means is that some colors (particular very deep ones) will look a little different to what the filmmaker intended.

Color Gamut Graph
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Remote Control
  10. Connectivity & Media
  11. Power, Noise & Heat
  12. ViewSonic PJD6531w Comparison
  13. Optoma HD66 Comparison
  14. Canon LV-8310 Comparison
  15. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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