projectors

Canon LV-8310

A great pick for business use, this projector produces bright images and has good color accuracy.

June 28, 2010
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Peak Brightness

The LV8310 has some power behind it: we measured the highest white screen lumen output of this projector at 2570 lumens in presentation mode. That's a little below the 3000 that Canon claims, but it's a pretty decent number for a sub-$1000 projector. The projector outputs less in the other modes: the standard mode managed 2120 lumens, while the cinema and video mode managed about 1720. That's not surprising; we usually see a reduction in the lumens the projector outputs for modes where color accuracy is more important than brightness.

On our 80-inch test screen, this translated into a screen brightness of 488 Cd/m2, as bright as a decent HDTV. However, you should consider that, like all projectors, the screen is much more sensitive to ambient light, so a projector will look much worse in anything other than near-total darkness than a HDTV.

Peak Brightness Graph

The LV-8310 compares well with the other projectors, although it is a close thing. The Epson 705HD has nearly the same brightness, but in a smaller, more compact package.

Tunnel Contrast

The peak brightness that a projector can produce is only half of the story: it also has to be able to produce deep, dark blacks at the same time. We found that the LV-8310 struggled a bit here: in our test of how well the blacks held up when surrounded by an increasing amount of white, the blacks quickly became muddy greys. To be fair, all projectors struggle with this test, and the LV-8310 is not much worse than others, but it is still disappointing to see.

Tunnel Contrast Graph
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Uniformity

We found that the LV-8310 produced clean, uniform screens when showing both black and white screens. We did notice some noticeable drop-off in the top left and top/bottom right corners, though, but this was subtle and wasn't particularly visible when watching normal video.

Uniformity Graph

Below are two photos of the projected image, showing an all white and all black screen. Note that these have been processed to enhance the uniformity differences.

Uniformity White Screen
Uniformity Black Screen

Greyscale Gamma

We measured the greyscale gamma of the image that this projector produced at 2.19, right in the 2.1 to 2.2 range that we look for as being ideal. This was with the projector in the cinema mode with the gamma control set to Natural.

Greyscale Gamma Graph
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. 3D
  7. Viewing Effects
  8. Calibration
  9. Remote Control
  10. Connectivity & Media
  11. Power, Noise & Heat
  12. Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 705HD Comparison
  13. ViewSonic PJD6531w Comparison
  14. Optoma HD66 Comparison
  15. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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