projectors

3M MP225a Pico Projector Review

A deplorably designed pico projector.

March 25, 2012
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Motion Smoothness

To judge the smoothness of moving objects displayed by the 3M MP225A we look primarily for detail retention and trailing of colors. We were happily surprised by how well this tiny projector retained detail with moving pictures. Faces were very clear, showing no blur at all, lines stayed perfectly rendered and separate. We did notice some bad color dragging, where previous frames were still visible on the screen.

The smoothness was really well done, especially for a low-end projector, but it almost doesn't matter. We had to really search for the smoothness capabilities through some of the worst artifacts we have ever seen with any display device.

Motion Artifacting

We expect a display to show the images we give it accurately. When it does not, when there are new parts in the picture that should not be there, we call these artifacts. The 3M MP225A displayed some of the worst artifacts to which we have ever been privy. Sometimes we see a rectangular object gain slanted sides or jagged edges because of a slow processor; not this time.

When we moved any object back and forth across the screen, the MP225A rendered it as though it were dancing back and forth. There was no consistency with how each part of the object moved, such that all parts moved at different times and rates, both changing as it progressed from right to left. Objects rippled all over as they were sent side to side, seemingly taunting us in some decadent hula dance. This performance was wholly atrocious and makes having strong detail retention negligible.

However, we had the guilty pleasure of bringing this item home and watching the famous battle of Hoth on the ceiling of our bedroom. Plugged into an iPod (the main intended function of the MP225A), and watching on a chipped paint surface (not the ideal screen, but a good example of the type of surface that 3M expects you to use) we saw no such problems and thoroughly enjoyed Episode V. So, though it did not perform well in our standard motion tests, we think you will get what you want out of this projector.

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Resolution Scaling

If you are looking standard video formats through the VGA cord, fuggedahbowwtiiiiiiit. The MP225A has a native resolution of1290x768 and does not support a 720p, 480p, or 1080p picture through the VGA plug we used.

Using the proprietary Apple cord, you can playback video at 720p or 1080i, and we had reasonable success doing so.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity & Media
  9. Power, Noise & Heat
  10. Optoma Pico PK320 Comparison
  11. Aiptek PocketCinema V50 Comparison
  12. AAXA Technologies P4 Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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